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Located some 260 km from Melbourne, the iconic Ninety Mile Beach is believed to be the fourth longest, uninterrupted beach in the world – still so natural and pristine bestowing unending views of sand, surf, dunes, natural bush and wildlife as far as the eye can see . . .  The sand is so clean that it “squeaks” as you walk.  Fishing, surf kayak, jet skiing, surfing, walking, exploring, relaxing, sunbathing, splashing in the waves, dissolving into the sand and sea and becoming one with nature; are all wonderful experiences to enjoy whilst on the beach or exploring the dunes.

Golden Beach - SmallThe beach spans some 94 miles (151 km), running north-eastward from a split at Port Albert to the man made entrance located at Lakes Entrance.  

The long, slender sand dune that forms the Ninety Mile Beach, is all that separates the ocean (Bass Strait) from the largest inland water system in the Southern Hemisphere, the Gippsland Lakes.  The sand dunes delight in the many and varied types of flora that can withstand and flourish in sand, sea and salt – from the Tea Tree to the Banksia – the under-story being a combination of beautiful grasses and bracken.

Golden Beach 017There are many, many stunning and varied villages, access points, campgrounds and facilities dotted along the massive dune and beach.

The relatively safe waters of the lakes that are nestled behind the dunes, bestow an enormous wonderland for water sporting enthusiasts – boating, kayaking, sailing, water skiing, jet skiing, fishing, kite surfing, paddle boarding and so forth.  Access to the more remote sectors of the Ninety Mile Beach is achieved via boat – clamber over the dunes – and an indulgence of beauty and the vastness of Mother Nature is revealed . . .

The crystal clear waters of the lakes are rich in minerals, generally sandy underfoot with shorelines varying from cliffs to sandy coves, islands, reserves, National and State parks, villages and jetties.  Lake Wellington’s waters tend to be more shallow and brownish in colour due to the tannins that leach from the trees and dead leaves; whereas Lakes King and Victoria are deeper and superbly clear.

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