On the third attempt to settle the southern reaches of the colony of New South Wales, ‘Port Phillip’ quickly became the hub of the region.  Two government settlements had previously failed – one in 1803 and the other in 1826.  It would be the private enterprise instigated and finally realised by John Batman in the May and June of 1835, that founded, and lead to, what we now know as the capital city of Victoria, Melbourne.  Sadly, his efforts were rewarded by the governance of the time with the overtaking of his discovery and the removal of  his land and all his assets.  Illness, overcame this strong, gentle, handsome, bushman and he would would die 4 years later, at the age of only 39 years – leaving a wife and family of eight children penniless.

Meanwhile, Melbourne grew at a remarkable rate which saw Europeans quickly penetrate inland – discover some of the significant events up to the early 20th Century, that moulded Victoria into the state of Australia, that we know today . . .

 

Historical POI – Central Victoria
Victoria Map Final

Region’s Boundary:
  • For the purpose of these Historical POI Timelines, the Central region is defined as follows:
  • Eastern Boundary:  Commences at Alexandra, and follows the major roadways southward to Kilcunda
  • Western Boundary:  commences at Torquay, and follows the major roadways northward to Bendigo via Ballarat
  • Northern Boundary:  commences at Bendigo, and follows the major roadways eastward to Alexandra
  • Southern Boundary:  is the coastline from Torquay eastward to Kilcunda

Historical POI – Eastern Victoria

Region’s Boundary:
  • For the purpose of these Historical POI Timelines, the Eastern region is defined as follows:
  • Western Boundary:  commences at Seymour, following the major roadways eastward to Alexandra, then southward to the coast at Kilcunda
  • Southern Boundary: commences at Kilcunda, and follows the coast eastward until the junction of the NSW / VIC border
  • Northern Boundary:  follows the NSW / VIC border from the junction of Highway M31 eastward to the coast

Historical POI – North Central Victoria

Region’s Boundary:
  •          For the purpose of these Historical POI Timelines, the North Central region is defined as follows:
  • Northern Boundary:  follows the NSW / VIC border from the junction of Highway A79 eastward to where Highway M31 intercepts
  • North-Western Boundary:  commences at Bendigo, running along Highway A79 north-westward to the NSW border
  • Eastern Boundary:  commences at Seymour, and follows Highway M31 north-eastward to the NSW border
  • Southern Boundary: commences at Bendigo, and follows the major roadways eastward to Seymour

Historical POI – North Western Victoria

Region’s Boundary:
  •          For the purpose of these Historical POI Timelines, the North Western region is defined as follows:
  • Northern Boundary:  follows the NSW / VIC border from the junction of the SA border eastward to where Highway A79 intercepts
  • Western Boundary:  is the SA border from the junction of Highway A8 northward to where the VIC border intercepts
  • North-Eastern Boundary:  commences at Bendigo, running along Highway A79 north-westward to the NSW border
  • Eastern Boundary:  commences at Ballarat, and follows the major roadways northward to Bendigo
  • Southern Boundary: commences at Ballarat, and follows Highway A8 westward to the SA border

Historical POI – South Western Victoria

Region’s Boundary:
  •                                                          For the purpose of these Historical POI Timelines, the South Western region is defined as follows:
  • Eastern Boundary:  commences at Torquay, and follows the major roadways northward to Ballarat
  • Northern Boundary:  commences at Ballarat, and follows Highway A8 westward to the SA border
  • Western Boundary:  is the SA border from the coast northward to the junction of Highway A8
  • Southern Boundary:  is the coastline from Torquay westward to the SA border

Shipping – Victoria

Some Timelines revealing Early Shipping in Victoria:

Coastal Runs – Victoria

So much of Australia was impenetrable by land – the lifeline of these new coastal settlements was the sea.  Discover the ships that plied up and down the coast – picking up and delivering supplies, cargo, communications and passengers . . .

Gippsland’s Steamers

Gain an appreciation of the significance of the Screw Steamers (SS) (Screw Steamers being propeller driven steamers), and the Paddle Steamers (PS) and that traversed the Gippsland lakes and rivers during the 19th and early 20th centuries is often overlooked.  The challenges they faced . . .  The many vessels that fell victim to the ever-changing entrance to the lakes . . .   This timeline provides an overview of how busy the water highways were, and, of the engineering ingenuity and accomplishments that built the infrastructure that is still in use today . . .

Inland Waterways – Victoria

The inland waterways were often the only communication for the early settlers.  Discover the rivers and lakes that transported the treasures and produce of the land to the rest of the world  . . .

The Steamers of Port Phillip Bay

Discover the romantic era of the steamer as they plied the waters of Port Phillip Bay.  Daily services transported passengers and cargo across the bay linking Melbourne to the Mornington and Bellarine Peninsulas.  They opened the glorious beaches to day trippers and holiday makers – grand Hotels provided refreshment.  Today, not one service remains as many of the piers and jetties fall into the sea, and, all the majestic steamers have been destroyed.  A trip to Melbourne from the Bellarine Peninsula was once 45 km across the sea – today, it is a 130 km journey along congested roads . . .

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